Review: A Lesson in Seduction
LESSONS IN LOVE: A Lesson in Seduction - D. Camille
Sable SiStars Publishing
BUY

February 2019
Contemporary Romance
REVIEWER:  Brenda Larnell | RATING:  A
REVIEW: The second story that is included in the book LESSONS IN LOVE is A Lesson In Seduction. This story also has as its main setting the Bantu Academy. The Academy is named after Bantu Stephen Biko, the late South African Anti-Apartheid Activist. The staff of the Academy, including the teaching staff, support staff and administration are dedicated to not only educating the students, but also investing in them through mentoring and involving the family members and community in the process. As the story opens, we are reacquainted with Kenya Barrett, close friend of Niyah Kendall-Miller, whose story is featured in ACT TWO of The Creators Series.  While Kenya, the heroine of this story, is preparing for a successful school year with her math students, the hero, Josiah Webber, the new school counselor, is dedicated to being a positive role model to the fourth grade boys he is specifically assigned to help. I liked Josiah’s character. He is just the kind of man Kenya needs - “the perfect intellectual thug”.

It is not long before Josiah is assigned to take on the task of counseling one of Kenya’s students, Dameon, who is ‘acting out’ at school which stems from his situation at home. Author D Camille astutely educates her readers to a very real syndrome that especially relates to Black boys. The Fourth Grade Failure Syndrome is real, and when you read the story, you will understand its importance in the education of our Black boys. Kudos to the author for seamlessly including this vital information into the story. Kenya joins forces with Josiah in order to help Dameon through his crisis. Yes, they are attracted to each other beyond the school setting. Their love journey is centered around sultry, satisfying seduction as you will discover when you read the story. Kenya and Josiah make a good team in school and after hours.

The connection between this story and characters from
The Creators Series is evident when many of them take on side character roles. If you read the Creators Series, you will have a better understanding of their purpose in this book. Other side characters like Dameon, his mother and brother, Ms. Adams, Miss Ella, and Andre West have crucial roles that help to move the storyline along. Speaking of Andre West, the scene where he and Josiah have a “discussion” is one of my favorites. I also enjoyed the school dance scene that brought many of the characters in this story, and in the first story, A Lesson In Romance, together. The HEA is gratifying and promising for Kenya and Josiah, as well as Dameon and his family.

The two masterfully written stories in this series are testaments to Black love and Black culture. D Camille is to be commended for enriching our reading horizons with her stories that educate, enhance and entertain. You can read this book as a stand-alone, but I would not recommend it. In order to get the full effect, I recommend that you also read
The Creators Series that is composed of ACTS ONE, TWO and THREE. I promise you won’t be sorry.

1st March 2019 | romcol@caribsurf.com
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